The Dial

An undated vintage photo of the Arima Dial. In 1898, Mayor John Francis Wallen presented the people of Arima with a clock, purchased in Nice, France. It was placed at the centre of the town at the corner of Broadway and Queen Street, and has since been known as the Arima Dial. The chimes of the original clock were said to give Arimians a sense of time, particularly at the start of a new day.

Sign on building says Arima Special Café.

Figure 2 Charcoal drawing by ???

This site is on the Heritage Asset Register which is the official list of Trinidad and Tobago’s historic sites that are worthy of notation and preservation. The register is authorized by the National Trust of Trinidad and Tobago’s Council and is by no means exhaustive. The sites on the Heritage Asset Register are not owned by the National Trust of Trinidad and Tobago.

The Dial is the most famous landmark in Arima. Mayor John Francis Wallen purchased it from Nice, France in 1898 and the chimes of the clock gave the people of Arima a sense of time. It was presented to the people of Arima in a time of increased civic pride with the rise of the cocoa crop. It was placed in the centre of town at the intersection of Broadway and Queen Street and has since been known as the Arima Dial. The chimes of the clock were said to give the people of Arima a sense of time, a sense of belonging, particularly at the start of a new day.

  • Site Type: Cultural Heritage
  • Ownership: Public
  • Public Accessibility: Full Access
  • Listing Status: Stage 7 – Notice of Intention has been published in the Trinidad and Tobago Gazette, the owners have been informed and the intention to list has been published in at least three issues of a daily newspaper

The dial when the Dial Center was new and donkey carts were common. This man was named Harry and he sold coconuts.